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The colonial scar

Conversation with Kopano Matlwa

South Africa after Apartheid

Debate

Kopano Matlwa, a doctor and one of South Africa’s most outstanding young writers, will speak with Xavier Aldekoa, journalist and Africa correspondent, about how the younger generations are dealing with the legacy of apartheid.

Matlwa was only nine years old when Nelson Mandela was elected president of South Africa. She was part of a new generation, described by Desmond Tutu as the “Rainbow Nation” which, if it did not experience apartheid directly, experienced its consequences in the years that came in its wake. Matlwa and many young people like her grew up with Mandela’s dream of an open, diverse, and democratic society, a vision that has faded as the numbers of cases of political corruption, inequality, and violence keep growing all around the country. In her books Coconut and Florescència (Sembra Llibres and Alpha Decay – in English: Coconut and Period Pain, Jacana Media), Matlwa considers the impossibility of looking to the future without healing wounds that still hurt in the present. What role can literature play in this task? Where is South Africa headed twenty-seven years after abolishing apartheid?

Kopano Matlwa will participate in this conversation by videoconference.

Participants: Kopano Matlwa, Xavier Aldekoa

This activity is part of William Kentridge, The colonial scar

Related contents

Kopano Matlwa

South Africa after Apartheid

Kopano Matlwa, a doctor and one of South Africa’s most outstanding young writers, speaks with Xavier Aldekoa, journalist and Africa correspondent, about how the younger generations are dealing with the legacy of apartheid.

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William Kentridge

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