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Talk with Tatiana Kasatkina, Tamara Djermanovic and Miquel Cabal

Dostoevsky, apocalypse and prophecy

Debate

In this session, writer and philosopher Tatiana Kasatkina will chat via videoconference with professor and writer Tamara Djermanovic and translator Miquel Cabal about the current relevance of Dostoevsky's work on the occasion of the bicentenary of his birth.

On November 11, 2021, the 200th anniversary of the birth of the writer and thinker Fyodor Dostoevsky, one of the most influential Russian writers in world literature, will be celebrated. Throughout his work, the writer, concerned with social injustice, abuse of power or simply the darker aspects of the human condition, perceived the various forms of authoritarianism and fundamentalism which could develop in modern industrial society. His writing, inspired by the complexity of the human soul, and his prophecies about the future of civilization, which announced the arrival of an increasingly cruel world, are still very relevant today to read our present.

In this talk, Miquel Cabal, translator of the book Crime and Punishment (La Casa dels Clàssics, 2021— in the catalan version), Tamara Djermanovic, Dostoevsky specialist and author of the recently published El universo de Dostoievsky (Acantilado, 2021), and Tatiana Kasatkina, Director of the Dostoevsky Center of the Russian Academy of Science, will reflect on how Dostoevsky's work continues to challenge us in the 21st century.

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Tatiana Kasatkina, Tamara Djermanovic and Miquel Cabal

Dostoevsky, apocalypse and prophecy

Talk about about the current relevance of Fyodor Dostoevsky's work, inspired by the complexity of the human soul, and his prophecies about the future of civilization, on the occasion of the bicentenary of his birth.

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