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House, Backyard, Car

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Who Has the Right to a House?

Debate

A fundamental voice in the struggle for the rights of the Black community, African American sociologist and historian Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor reveals the origins and evolution of urban racial segregation in her country.

The possibility of home ownership is one of the elements of the “American Dream” and an almost inalienable right among its citizens. This dream, however, has often been unattainable for a large number of people in the United States: until the late 1970s, Black Americans could be legally prevented from buying a home. Professor of African American Studies Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor has studied in depth the mechanisms that, over decades, have fomented the segregation of millions of people of colour in her country through discriminatory laws and practices. Looking at the fight for the right to housing as an example of the inequalities in American society, in this session Taylor highlights the dynamics that still perpetuate the exclusion of millions of people in this country due to the colour of their skin.

Presenters: Ben Ehrenreich

Participants: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

This activity is part of Suburbia, House, Backyard, Car

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Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Who Has the Right to a House?

A fundamental voice in the struggle for the rights of the Black community, African American sociologist and historian Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor reveals the origins and evolution of urban racial segregation in her country, Looking at the fight for the right to housing as an example of the inequalities in American society.

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Suburbia

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