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Evgeny Morozov

Evgeny Morozov (Salihorsk, Belarus, 1984) is among the world’s leading researchers inquiring into the social and political consequences of technology. He is a visiting scholar at Stanford University and a Schwartz fellow at the New America Foundation. He writes for Foreign Policy and Boston Review. He was formerly a Yahoo! Fellow at the Georgetown University Institute for the Study of Diplomacy and a fellow at the Open Society Institute of New York. His critical reflections on technology and Internet are frequently published in El País, The Economist, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, The International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, Le Monde, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, The San Francisco Chronicle, Prospect, Dissent and other publications, and he also works with CNN, CBS, SkyNews, CBC, Al Jazeera International, France 24, Reuters TV, NPR and the BBC. His book The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom, in which he expresses scepticism about the view that Internet is a positive force for global democratisation, has been published in Spanish (El desengaño de internet. Los mitos de la libertad en la red, Destino, 2012). Indeed, he sees the Web as being more like an instrument of mass surveillance and repression. In his most recent book, To Save Everything, Click Here. The Folly of Technological Solutionism (2013), he questions the “solutionist” mentality which leads experts to believe that technological advances will be able to resolve a considerable number of future problems, and recommends that technology should be a matter for public debate in which assumptions are questioned, just as they are in discussions about politics, economics and history.

Update: 14 January 2014

Contents

Publications

Has participated in

How to Socialise the Rewards of Innovation

Lecture by Mariana Mazzucato, dialogue with Evgeny Morozov

Brian Eno and Evgeny Morozov

A Conversation about Technology and Democracy

Democracy, Technology and City

Opening Lecture by Evgeny Morozov

Citizenship, Internet and Democracy

A New Public Sphere?